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Direct access

The public access scheme

Since 2004 members of the public and organisations have been able to instruct a barrister directly, without having to hire a solicitor first. In many cases it can save you money and get things moving faster.

The barrister’s role remains the same, whoever is doing the instructing. There are limits to the work that can be done, and in some cases a solicitor still needs to be involved, however, for many situations it’s a good idea to approach a barrister directly.

Direct access barristers cannot handle clients’ money (unrelated to their fee) or take responsibility for the management of a case, unless they are authorised to conduct litigation. Guy Moore is a qualified direct access barrister and he is also authorised to conduct litigation.

There are many cases where instructing a barrister directly could help you.

If you’d like to discuss this, please contact our clerks.

What kind of work can you ask a direct access barrister to do?

Advice

Providing legal advice (in writing or in person) about your case, the law and how it affects your situation and any legal steps you must take.

Drafting documents

Court documents, statements of case, other documents required for court, letters and trust deeds.

Representation

Representing you at court or at other tribunals, appeal hearings, etc.

What are the benefits of going direct to a barrister?

Training

Barristers must be trained in Public Access before they are allowed to accept this type of work, so you can be confident they’ll have the skills needed to help you.

Financial benefit

There’s a substantial financial benefit as legal costs are usually much higher when a solicitors fees are added to the bill, and correspondence is usually quicker as you deal  directly with the Barrister.  So you can often rectify a situation faster and with lower costs.

Code of Conduct

What’s more, all practising barristers are subject to the Code of Conduct set out by the Bar Standards Board, designed to protect their clients.